Homeowners insurance 101

Today’s lesson is homeowners insurance 101: what it is, why you need it for a mortgage and how much it is.

Homeowners insurance (also called home insurance or property insurance) covers several things:

  • Property damage (pretty self-explanatory)
  • Personal property loss (for example if your house is burglarized or damaged due to an event that’s covered by your insurance)
  • Personal liability (if someone is hurt on your property or if you’re responsible for property damage or injury due to negligence)

What you receive in compensation completely depends on the damage done and the limits that are spelled out in your policy. When it comes to personal property, items like jewelry and cash on-hand typically have limits, but you can increase the limits with additional premiums.

So really, homeowners insurance is a safety net. If your house is damaged or completely destroyed, it can be difficult to make those costly repairs or possibly rebuild out-of-pocket.

Most states (like Washington) don’t require you to have homeowners insurance IF you own your home outright. However, if you are among the many who get a mortgage, your lender will require homeowners coverage. That’s because technically your mortgage company is part owner of the house and they need to protect its value.

As far as natural events go, standard insurance typically covers fire, wind, snow and sleet. A few natural events usually require additional coverage, such as flooding and earthquakes. That’s why if you live in a floodplain your lender will more than likely require additional coverage.

The cost of homeowners insurance is usually based upon the value of your property. Washington has one of the lowest rates in the nation. The national average is $1,288 while Washington’s average is $653. Spokane is right around $600. States prone to natural disasters (eg Florida, Oklahoma, Alabama) have premiums right around $3,000.

If you’re buying a new home and already have homeowners insurance through a provider with your current home, you can work with them to transfer coverage to your new house. If you don’t currently have homeowners insurance or if you’re a first time homebuyer, your lender can find and assign you one. I recommend doing some checking around with different companies and getting quotes. If your car insurance provider also provides homeowners insurance, you can bundle it and typically get a discounted price for both.

If you need to get setup with an insurance agent to chat with, let me know. I have a few recommendations that I can send your way.

 

Posted on November 1, 2018 at 3:29 PM
Alyssa Curnutt | Category: Buyers

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *